Upcoming conventions

Although I don’t attend a lot of conventions, I actually have two coming up within the next couple of months.

First up is next weekend: I’ll be doing a reading and appearing in a panel on women in SF at Heliosphere con on Saturday, March 11th in Tarrytown, NY. Heliosphere is a brand new con that will be taking place over the entire weekend; unfortunately, I’ll only be able to be there on Saturday, but if you’ve got the time, you should definitely check it out.

And then, on April 7-8, I’ll be attending Lunacon 2017, also in Tarrytown (that must be a really hoppin’ community!). Lunacon has been around for a very long time, and Jim & I used to go every year. We’ve neglected it in recent years, but we will be attending it this year at its new digs — only Friday and Saturday, since it is unfortunately scheduled a bit close to Passover. But if you want to come by and spot me wandering in the halls, stop and say hi!

Oh, and a final thank you to Bill Shunn for inviting me to read yesterday (Saturday, March 4th) at the monthly Line Break reading series, which takes place at Q.E.D. in Queens. It was a huge amount of fun.

A Nebula Nomination!

I am astounded (no, really) to announce that my story “Sabbath Wine,” which was published in the anthology Clockwork Phoenix 5, has been nominated for a 2016 Nebula Award. I’m even more honored by the quality of the other short stories that have been nominated; they include:

  • “Our Talons Can Crush Galaxies”, Brooke Bolander (Uncanny)
  • “Seasons of Glass and Iron”, Amal El-Mohtar (The Starlit Wood)
  • “Things With Beards”, Sam J. Miller (Clarkesworld)
  • “This Is Not a Wardrobe Door”, A. Merc Rustad (Fireside Magazine)
  • “A Fist of Permutations in Lightning and Wildflowers”, Alyssa Wong (Tor.com)
  • “Welcome to the Medical Clinic at the Interplanetary Relay Station│Hours Since the Last Patient Death: 0”, Caroline M. Yoachim (Lightspeed)

Congratulations to all the nominees — these and those in the other categories.

“Sabbath Wine,” was a real labor of love; I’m so glad that it has been enjoyed by those who read it.

I’ll be reading at Line Break!

Amid all the political upheavals, some fun news: I’ll be taking part in a reading at the Line Break series in Queens. Here’s the description from the website: “Line Break is the eclectic live literary magazine where poetry meets prose, fact meets fiction, and high-brow meets low-brow.” It’s run by Bill Shunn, a fine writer in his own right.

The reading happens on the first Saturday of every month, and I’ll be appearing there Saturday, March 4, along with Keith R.A. DeCandido, Emily Hockaday, Jonathan Sumpter and Andrew Willett. We each get about 12 minutes; I haven’t decided what to read yet, but it’s gonna be short.

So come if you can! Here are the details:

Line Break Reading Series
Saturday, March 4, 2017, 3:00-4:30 p.m.

Hosted by William Shunn

Q.E.D.: A Place for Show & Tell
27-16 23rd Avenue
Astoria, NY 11105

Admission $7. Beer, wine and snacks available.

 

Upcoming reading at the Twenty-Sided Store

So I’m going to be part of this reading in the highly fashionable neighborhood of Williamsburg in the highly fashionable borough of Brooklyn at the newly fashionable Twenty-Sided Store, where the highly fashionable go to game. (No, really, I understand it’s really a neat place.)
 
I will be reading alongside a bunch of highly talented writers, including Chris Kreuter, Carlos Hernandez, C.S.E. Cooney, and Rob Cameron.
 
It’s all happening this Thursday, December 22nd, at 7 pm. The Twenty-Sided Store is located at 362 Grand Street in Brooklyn. It sounds like it’s gonna be a lot of fun. Drop on by if you can.

Triptych Tales – The Anthology: 2017

triptych-tales-anthologyI was very pleased just now to get an email informing me that an anthology of stories from the website Triptych Tales has just been released — an anthology that includes my (hopefully creepy) story “The Waterbug.”

Triptych Tales specializes in “stories that take place in our world, our world with a twist, or our world as it could be in the very near future.” (The way U.S. politics are going these days, I’m beginning to feel like I’m living in “our world with a twist,” but that’s a blog entry for another time.) Besides my story, there are stories by a variety of excellent authors such as Liz Kershaw, David Steffen, Kenneth Schneyer, and others.

Right now, the anthology is available in Kindle and print versions through Amazon; I’m told that an ePub version is in the works.

Enjoy!

Yes, I’ve also got an award eligibility post

I’ve been going through several of the posts recommending genre work that has been published throughout 2016 and promoting their own, and I’m really impressed with the all the great stuff out there. (And getting ready for a reading frenzy.)

For example, I’ve just finished rolling through A. C. Wise’s commodious What Have You Done, What Have You Loved? 2016 Edition and Fran Wilde’s Things To Read While Rebooting posts, both of which are musts if you want to find something good to read.

So I thought I’d contribute my own, much shorter list of my own eligible works and a few of the works that I’ve read and enjoyed over the past year.

Eligible Works

Sabbath Wine
Clockwork Phoenix 5
This story, about a father trying to put together a Sabbath meal for his daughter and her new friend during Prohibition, is one that I’m especially proud of.

Unfortunately, it’s not available to read online. SFWA members can find it as a PDF attachment in the Short Stories 2016 area of the SFWA forums. Otherwise, there is a video of me reading it at a recent NYRSF Readings session. (Or, of course, you can always buy the book! <g>)

With Triumph Home Unto Her House
Abyss & Apex
Near-future science fiction with a bit of social politics thrown in. A middle-aged middle-class woman tries to work her way back after a series of financial disasters and learns that following the rules doesn’t always work.

Recommended works

Unfortunately, it’s been a busy year, and I haven’t done nearly as much reading as I’d like, but here are some that come to mind. (Hopefully, I’ll add more over the next few days.)

Short stories

El Cantar of Rising Sun by Sabrina Vourvoulias
Uncanny Magazine #13
A lovely, poetic and tragic story. One of my favorites of the year.

Wilson’s Singularity by Terence Taylor
People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction! / Lightspeed
I have to say that I’m prejudiced in favor of this one because it was workshopped in my writers group. It’s a great story of how change can have society and personal effects.

Breathe Deep, Breathe Free by Jenn Brissett
People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction! / Lightspeed
Two kids text each other in a world that is uncomfortably possible.

A Handful of Dal by Naru Dames Sundar
People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction! / Lightspeed
A recipe changes through the generations but still helps keep descendants rooted.

The Book of May by C. S. E. Cooney and Carlos Hernandez
Clockwork Phoenix #5
Not going to say anything except this one made me cry and smile at the same time. Really.

Things With Beards by Sam J. Miller
Clarkesworld #117
A wonderful, frightening and touching follow-up to The Thing (1982 version).

Novels and Collections

Bone Swans by C. S. E. Cooney
A lovely collection of stories; it won the 2016 World Fantasy award.

All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders
I’m not usually a fan of novels where “apocalypse” is part of the story description, but I’m glad I made an exception for this one.

The Assimilated Cuban’s Guide to Quantum Santeria by Carlos Hernandez
Fabulous (in both senses of the word) stories with a nice sense of humor behind many of them.

Clockwork Phoenix #5 edited by Mike Allen
I’m sorry to be repeating myself here, but besides the story mentioned above (and my own), there is some really fine writing in here. Very worth checking out.

Tomorrow: The Margot Adler Memorial Reading

img_20140315_115911890Margot Adler was one of those people whose lives are a marvel. She was known and loved by many people who were part of many different communities: those who worked at and listened to the radio stations where she worked, WBAI and WNYC; the members of the Wiccan community; those who read her books on paganism, Drawing Down the Moon and Heretic’s Heart; and those who read her later book Vampires Are Us: Understanding Our Love Affair with the Immortal Dark Side, and who heard her speak about it. And probably many more.

Originally, I knew Margot’s husband, John Gliedman, as well or better than I knew Margot. He was an extremely smart (actually, quite brilliant), technically knowledgeable, and just plain nice human being who occasionally freelanced as a technical writer. John and Margot lived in a beautiful apartment on Central Park West, and some of my best memories are of meeting them there to talk, watch movies (or the election returns), or just hang out.

John died in 2010. Margot died in 2014. Both died too early. I miss them both.

Tomorrow (Tuesday, November 1st), the first Margot Adler Memorial Reading will be held at the NY Review of SF Readings — appropriately, on All Soul’s Day. It is being curated by Terence Taylor, and features Terence and Sabrina Vourvoulias — two exceptional writers of fantastic fiction. It will take place at 7 pm at the Brooklyn Commons Cafe at 388 Atlantic Avenue.

I hope to see you there.