Published: “Hard Times, Cotton Mill Girl”

ASM_71-Cover-e1528066901443After a long publication drought, I’m pleased to announced that my short story, entitled “Hard Times, Cotton Mill Girl,” is appearing in the latest issue of Andromeda Spaceways Magazine, a long-running publication available here in PDF, ePub or Mobi versions.

The story has its beginnings in a day trip I took with some friends to Boott Cotton Mills Museum in Lowell, Mass., a few Readercons ago. It was a fascinating visit; this is an old cotton mill that you could walk through along with a small museum that illustrated the lives of those who worked in it. (And the history of Lowell is, in fact, fascinating — it was an attempt by well-meaning people to create a relatively safe environment for young women doing factory work. If the subject interests you, I encourage you to check it out.)

One reason I was so interested in visiting the mill is this: I was brought up with a consciousness of labor history. And one of the books that I remember looking at over and over again when I was a child had a photo of a little girl in a factory looking wistfully out of a window; it was accompanied by a poem by Sarah Norcliffe Cleghorn that I learned by heart:

The golf links lie so near the mill
That almost every day
The laboring children can look out
And see the men at play.

The memory of that photo and poem, along with the tour we took at the museum, sparked the story.

Lincoln_Cotton_Mills,_Evansville,_Ind._Girls_at_weaving_machines,_warpers._Evansville,_Ind._-_NARA_-_523100Finally, when I started writing, I looked for a picture of a girl who could be my protagonist. I found this one. It was taken by Lewis Hines in 1908 at the Lincoln Cotton Mills in Evansville, Ind., and is entitled Girls at Weaving Machine.

I don’t know the name of the girl in the photo, or if there is any way of finding out who she really was or what happened to her. Everything else in the story is, of course, imaginary. But this is the girl I saw in my mind when I wrote about Emilia.

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Now online: “The Ladder-Back Chair”

Mythic_Delirium_3_4_cove_webMy short story, “The Ladder-Back Chair,” which was published in the April-June print edition of Mythic Delirium, is now available online.

I’m especially pleased because it is appearing alongside a wonderful poem called “Grave Robber” by Jane Yolen. I had the honor of sitting next to her during the author autographing session at last month’s Nebula Conference in Pittsburgh, where she was Grand Master; she’s not only a great writer, but a lovely person.

The June online edition also features a poem “bn ʾdnbʿl bn ʾdrbʿl”by the talented writer Sonya Taafle.

So I hope you enjoy these, and the other now-online stories and poems in the issue.

 

Sold! “The Ladder-Back Chair” to Mythic Delirium

I’m happy to announce that my story “The Ladder-Back Chair” has been officially accepted by Mike Allen’s lovely magazine Mythic Delirium. It will appear in an upcoming issue.

“The Ladder-Back Chair” is sort of — maybe, perhaps — a ghost story, prompted by my memories of my parents’ home (which was sold a little over a year ago when my mother moved to an apartment, and so no longer exists as it was except in those remembrances). It’s the second story I’ve sold to this venue (the first being last year’s “Sophia’s Legacy”) and it’s very exciting to be able to appear there once again.

 

A new short story at Abyss & Apex

with-triumph-home-unto-her-house-illustration-e1450619552581With all the fuss, bother and excitement of CES (the tech trade show that takes up a week of my life each January), I somehow completely neglected a highly important event: The publication of my short story “With Triumph Home Unto Her House” in issue 57 (the first issue of 2016) of Abyss & Apex.

“With Triumph…” is more science fictiony than fantasy; it takes place in a near-future U.S. in which a formerly middle-class woman tries to earn her way back into society after committing the crime of unemployment.

I’m really pleased to have my work appear in Abyss & Apex. It’s now online and available for reading; I hope you enjoy it!

Yay! My story “Sabbath Wine” will appear in Clockwork Phoenix 5!

CP5_cover_mockup_small-200x300I’m very pleased to announce that my story “Sabbath Wine” has been sold for the upcoming anthology Clockwork Phoenix 5, edited by Mike Allen (@mythicdelirium, for the Twitterites).

This is the third Clockwork Phoenix that I’ve had work appear in; “The History of Soul 2065” appeared in Clockwork Phoenix 4 and “Rosemary, That’s For Remembrance” was in Clockwork Phoenix 2.  But there’s no way I take my submissions to one of these for granted — when I sent in “Sabbath Wine,” I was incredibly nervous (even though I am rather proud of that story) and incredibly delighted when I’d heard that it had been accepted.

The full table of contents and publishing date hasn’t been revealed yet –that should come soon. Meanwhile, congrats to all my new anthology-mates — I’m looking forward to reading all your stories!

My short story “Sophia’s Legacy” is now available on Mythic Delirium

Mythic_Delirium_1_4_coverGreetings all! If you’re looking for something to read, you might want to try my short story “Sophia’s Legacy,” which just went live on the Mythic Delirium site. It’s part of the July-September issue of the magazine; the stories are released over the course of three months, and mine was held for September. Enjoy!

In other news, I’ve sold my story entitled “Of Their Sweet Deaths Are Sweetest Odours Made” to TripTych Tales — it’s the second story I’ve sold to them; the first was “The Waterbug.” They’ve got a lot of good fiction on that site; you should check it out.

And I’ve sold another story as well, which I’ll report on as soon as the contract is signed…

Short stories I got published in 2014

I’d been feeling a bit discouraged about the visibility (or lack thereof) of my published writing — nothing serious, just the periodic self-pity fest that most writers go though occasionally — and then I read Amal El-Mohtar’s essay Of Awards Eligibility Lists and Unbearable Smugness, about how women too often are shy about promoting their work, especially around awards season.

Thank you, Amal — and thanks to N.K. Jemisin, whose Facebook entry led me to it.

So here’s a list of the short stories I’ve had published this year, along with where they’ve appeared and very short descriptions. All of them except the one published in Space and Time are available online. If you like, read one or two:

“Topfuntersetzer”
Perihelion/November 2014
Science fiction/humor

“The Waterbug”
Triptych Tales/September 2014
Sort-of-fantasy/vague weirdness

“Under the Bay Court Tree”
Space and Time #121/Summer 2014
Urban fantasy

“Symbiosis”
Crossed Genres/February 2014
Urban fantasy